Biography & Autobiography

What am I? I am my life. All my life is my Time

“Bryant writes with force and beauty. His deep insights into the elements of rhythm, the “time body,” and the cycles in human life, combined with examples from biographies as diverse as Nehru, Marilyn Monroe, and Leo Tolstoy, make for a book that cannot be put down until finished. An invaluable work for counselors, educators, and those who wonder about their destiny.”

Robert Sardello, PhD, author of Facing the World with Soul

Our biography is our most precious, intimate possession, yet how much do we really know about ourselves? With a little work, we can discover in the unfolding of our biography the traces of a marvelous, cosmic patterning—the cycles of our life.

The seven-year cycle converts experience into psychological faculties;

The twelve-year cycle marks the way changing self-awareness of the personality is translated into our life’s work;

The thirty-year cycle marks a major turning point in life.

The Veiled Pulse of Time explores these cycles and discusses questions of freedom and destiny, transformation, reincarnation, and karma.

  1. Rhythms and Cycles

  2. The Sacred Seven

  3. The Chronos Cycle

  4. The Jupiter Cycle

  5. Fate, Freedom, and Destiny

  6. The Seasons of Immortality

When a Stone Begins to Roll

“Laurence Oliphant was acquainted with most of the prominent members of the Theosophical Society of his time. They even invited him to join in, but he declined the offer; it seemed to him that H.P. Blavatsky’s theosophy was not sufficiently Christian. Clearly, he was not referring to the “Christ” of the Catholic or Protestant churches but to the true Christ individuality, who also acts in the realm of the supernatural. Indeed, we can regard Oliphant as a herald of the new Christ event.” (from the introduction)

Laurence Oliphant is one of the great unknown personalities of the nineteenth century, and indeed of recent cultural history at large. He was born at Cape Town in 1829 and died near London in 1888. He left behind some twenty books, including novels, travel accounts, and mystical spiritual writings. He was diplomat, traveler, adventurer, writer, and mystic.

At the beginning of the 1860s, the period of Oliphant’s great spiritual transition began when he met the Swedenborgian Thomas Lake Harris. It was Oliphant's last works, Sympneumata and Scientific Religion, that prompted Rudolf Steiner to pursue karmic research on Oliphant. As a result, Steiner revealed the karmic relationship between the lives of Oliphant and the Roman poet Ovid. In an August 24, 1924, lecture in London, Steiner commented that Oliphant’s individuality is significant not only because of the previous Ovid incarnation, but also because of its activity in the interval between the two incarnations. Looked at in the light of spiritual research on the subject, Oliphant’s life assumes dimensions of world-historical interest. 

When a Stone Begins to Roll contains extensive selections from Oliphants autobiographical book, Episodes in a Life of Adventure; or, Moss from a Rolling Stone (1887). In addition to the insightful commentary of T.H. Meyer, the book also offers a generous sampling of Oliphant’s complex and compelling work, as well as hitherto unpublished material and the satire “The Sisters of Tibet.”

Living on the Fringe: A Memoir

When Ed Entin decided to torch his draft card, everything about his life changed. He had his whole life mapped out. It was 1966 and Eddie had just been accepted into Yale Law School—his ticket out of the Army and Vietnam and into a life of secure prosperity. 

It took only one day, one decision to change the course of his life. What follows is a sometimes harrowing, often hilarious, and always illuminating ten-year journey through the social, political, and spiritual turmoil of the era. 

For anyone wondering how it was back then—or how to get through right now—Living on the Fringe provides a look at how one person waded into the turbulent waters of his time and came out whole, dry, and ready to face the future. And with a new name to match the person he had become.

“Abraham Entin has written a really magnificent book . . . a delightful read from cover to cover. So buy it and read it—you won’t be disappointed.” —Ken Cloke, author, founder and director of Center for Dispute Resolution

“Abraham Entin has written an outrageous, hugely entertaining memoir . . . about what it’s like to go up against the man and come out smiling—and still fighting—on the other side.” —Saul Rubinek, actor, writer, producer, and director in theater, film, and television